Breadsall Scouts

 

Scouting in Breadsall

 


The first record we have of Scouting in Breadsall are two Challenge Cups, dated 1912/1913. These are engraved Breadsall, Morley and Smalley Scouts and are kept in the Derby East District Scout Headquarters Museum in Osmaston Road, together with the old 104th Scout Flag.

The next record is prior to the last World War when Breadsall Scouts were known as the 104th Derby, Breadsall Old Hall. This ceased as leaders were conscripted with some of the boys becoming A.R.P. messenger boys at the headquarters on Chester Green. The 104th was resurrected after the war, meeting in the barn above the stables at the Lodge, closing through lack of leaders in 1951.

In 1965, the Rector, John Norman was instrumental in reviving the Scouting and Guiding in the Village. At this time the Scouts were reformed as the 158th Derby, 1st Breadsall Village. The meetings were held in the Chapel Sunday School room in Pall Mall, a Nissan type army hut. However in 1979, John and Edna Blount most generously donated the adjoining piece of land, thus creating a very fine headquarters for the organisation.

A dedicated and hardworking Scout and Guide Supporters' Association, made up of parents and friends, raised substantial amounts of money for the purchase and modernisation of the building, which involved brick cladding, re-roofing and interior refurbishment. During the 1980s a further extension was added.

A Venture Scouting Unit was created in 1974 for the male and female members aged 16 to 21 years. This very enthusiastic group raised a great deal of money for charities through various sponsored hikes and other activities.

The 1982, 'The Year of the Scout', a beacon was lit on land belonging to Glebe Farm, the highest point in Breadsall by kind permission of the Bestwick family. These were lit throughout the Country.

An excellent project set up in 1981 in Derby East District, was Christmas Card Stamp and Deliver service, kindly sponsored by local businesses. Breadsall Scouts have always participated and many local charities have benefited greatly from the proceeds, at the same time supporting Scouting itself.

The 145th Hilltop Scouts have now amalgamated with the 158th Derby, 1st Breadsall Village and are now flourishing. Since the mid-1980s, this has included a Beaver Colony for six to eight year olds. Girls are now accepted as members of Beaver, Cubs and Scouts.

Long May they Continue

John Sibson November 2001

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